How to Care for Your Tennis Racket and Other Equipment

Your tennis racket and other equipment for the sport are investments you should never take for granted. Hence, it makes sense to practice proper care and maintenance to prolong their life span and to save money in the long run. Here are a few guidelines and tips to care for your tennis racket and other tennis equipment:

  • Do not use your racket to hit other things (and people) – Performance rackets are made of sensitive materials, like graphite. Each impact can break the composite of graphite fibers down, even if the damage is usually invisible, and the frame becomes compromised. If your racket keeps hitting the iron net or the concrete floor, you may need to buy a new racket sooner than you should.
  • Do not leave it under the sun or in extremely cold areas – Too much heat will cause the frame to soften, especially if it is made of graphite, and when it does, the pressure from the strings will make it warp. Heat will make the strings lose tension and stretch, and extreme cold will make them hard and brittle, and increase your risk of developing tennis elbow.
  • Restring your racket – Strings lose their tension after a year. Remember that tension directly pertains to control, feel, and power of the racket. Restring as often as you can according to the number of hours you play each week. For instance, if you play three hours each week, restring your racket three times annually.
  • Work with a professional – Be sure to have your racket serviced by a USRSA master racket technician or a certified stringer. USRSA is the only organization that is recognized in the tennis community around the world to certify and train racket service professionals.
  • Change your grip – A worn out grip reduces comfort and control. Not only that, it can become a place where bacteria can thrive. Hence, replace grips at least twice a year. If you use overgrips, change then monthly or weekly, depending on the amount of time you spend on the tennis court.
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