Tennis Racket String – What Factors to Consider

Your tennis racket strings inevitably wear down and lose their tension and elasticity. This can happen quite fast; in fact, the strings lose about 10% of their tension in the first 24 hours after stringing. If you don’t restring your racket regularly, you might begin to adjust your technique to compensate for the tension loss—and this can ruin your training.

So, how often should you replace your tennis racket strings? The rule of thumb is to count how many times you play per week. If you play 2 times a week, replace your strings 2 times a year. If you play 5 times a week, replace your strings 5 times a year. This is just a general guideline, of course. Other factors such as your style of play, budget, and your personal preferences should also be taken into consideration. If you hit soft and tend to come to the net, you might not really need to restring your racquet often. But if you’re a hard hitting baseliner, restringingmore frequently might be a good idea because you are subjecting your strings to a significantly greater amount of wear.

For most tennis players, having to stay on a budget is a fact of life. If you simply don’t have the money to restring your racquet as frequently as you should, then don’t. The alternative is to look at the type of strings that you’re using. The construction, material, as well as the gauge of the strings you choose can drastically affect the rate at which you might need to restring.The perfect string can also help you find the best tennis racket easily.

And then, of course, you need to think about your preferences. Are you just playing tennis for fun and fitness? If you are not concerned with the tension variation, wait until you’re truly ready to play consistently and often and want to restring for performance reasons.

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